February 2019

Lunar Lunacy

February 19th was the date of the Supermoon spectacle providing the biggest and brightest full moon glow of the year. Often blamed for strange happenings in folklore, myth and paranormal stories, does this larger-than-usual moon actually trigger increased feelings of lunacy?

Scientists say no.

According to Lunar Lunacy research (yes, that’s a real thing), the commonly held superstition that the full moon makes us crazy has been tested and scientists have failed to find genuine links between the moon phases and increased feelings of lunacy.

However …

Researchers do recommend that we ‘need to take the topic seriously because … so many people believe that their behaviour is influenced by the moon.’

So, is our crazed behaviour determined by a belief in an external cause? Or is the external cause to blame for our crazed behaviour?

I don’t know. But I did have a very frenetic February. Did you?

The back to school blur just kept going. For three weeks. Which is pretty much all of February.

I drove around in a car filled with Apollo Bay sand because I didn’t want the holidays to end. As long as that sand was still in my car the beach was still there with me, and part of me was still on holiday.

Is that lunacy? Maybe.

Passenger feedback did prompt me to vacuum away the happy memories/sand and accept that the holiday was over.

But …

The lunacy continued and I entered a writing competition. Madness.

So now my story, Feeding Time, has joined the hundreds of other stories waiting to be read by the judges of the Newcastle Short Story Award.

Now that is a crazy thought.

For scientific, moon-related references click here.

This is a scary creature I found washed up on the morning after the Supermoon. It has nothing to do with entering a writing competition, but it might be a victim of lunar lunacy.

This is a scary creature I found washed up on the morning after the Supermoon. It has nothing to do with entering a writing competition, but it might be a victim of lunar lunacy.